resolving_panic_attack_mathias_egger

Resolving a panic attack related to coronavirus.

We are human and we all react to the current global pandemic. We may experience a range of distressing thoughts, emotions and physical sensations in response to situation.  Mathias Egger is a clinical psychologist and psychotherapist based in Switzerland. He shares this example of working with a client and using Logosynthesis as a tool to help a client resolve a panic attack related to coronavirus.

The starting point for this session is related to panic attacks that have occurred at night in the past few weeks. The client reports that his neck hurts, he exprience problems with swallowing and feels tightness. The client doesn’t know Logosynthesis yet, but we’ve known each other for a long time. After a short imprint / image exercise for the mood and getting to know logosynthesis, we walk directly “in mediasres”.

In the last few weeks, panic attacks have built up at night, which was associated with thoracal pressure, tight, heart palpitations and strong anxiety. He began to watch the body closely or maybe rather ‘overwatch’. With the often praised breathing exercises, he could not start to self-reassure.  This is not surprising, since this strengthens the focus on fear-emphasized body perceptions. In a short email exchange, he has already described the situation to me. He had a medical examination and the test for coronavirus was – as almost suspected – negative.

At the moment, he has been working on his own with different strategies. The fear is less overall but a few days ago he also perceived migraine head pressure. Thoughts are circling less intensely, but there are still questions about psychosomatic or somatic causality in the room. In clarification, he describes how he would take on the concerns of others.

I ask who he cares about most.  He replies he cares about his parents, especially for his mother. He sees her in the room – on the left side – with all her fragility. This image triggers uncertainty and concern. The SUDS rating is 5. After the sentences for this image, a cozy warmth and a lightness, like cotton, is created. After the third sentence, he perceived a mood for departure. The trigger changes so that he now perceives his mother happy.  A slight residual tension remains in the body. He feels this in the diaphragm region. He describes a pressure that feels like the outside of the palms of his hands pushing on his belly. A second round to the imprint of the ‘palms of the hand’. Breathe, the pressure disappears.

We return to the first appearance of the panic attacks in the timeline. In doing so, he perceives a “dark silence” around him. This triggers loneliness and insecurity. We apply the sentences to the perception of the ‘dark silence’. There seems to be a lot of energy shifting and we leave it here.  Overall, he feels more strength in his back.  The anxiety attacks seem less threatening. The burden is currently unpredictable.

🌺 And here’s the feedback from the client after two weeks:

🌼 ” I would be happy to send you a little update to me: I read your book (Note from Mathias: Letting It Go (Weiss, 2016)) with great interest after finding it in my inbox. As soon as I felt like some insecurity or anxiety arise, I formulated appropriate sentences. And it actually worked – I can only amaze. I’ve never had a tightness in my chest since we talked, which of course I am very thankful for. Luckily I didn’t have a panic attack anymore; I am calm, while looking good for giving myself to some rest time especially in the evening.”

Logosynthesis, founded by Willem Lammers, is a model for selfcoaching and guided change based on the power of words and sentences to change energy fields. Based on a survey of an international group of professionals trained in Logosynthesis, 83% of respondents indicate that it has transformed how they approach their role as coach, therapist or guide. 

* Photography credit goes to Mathias as he captures the beauty of his community in Switzerland.